Home Forum General Category Altri Paesi Norvegia

27 risposte, 0 voices Last updated by  sh4rp87 4 anni fa
Stai vedendo 15 articoli - dal 1 a 15 (di 57 totali)
  • Autore
    Articoli
  • #103

    sh4rp87
    Membro
    @sh4rp87

    Ciao a tutti! Sono uno studente del quarto anno e da un po’, vedendo la situazione sanitaria italiana, sto pensando di andare a lavorare in un paese scandinavo (o Danimarca). Per quel che concerne Svezia e Danimarca ho già trovato altre discussioni molto utili mentre riguardo la Norvegia no. Siccome ho ancora un pò di tempo per organizzarmi vorrei fare qualche domanda a chi magari ha esperienze in questo paese:
    Conviene fare un Erasmus in questo paese? se sì, conviene fare un corso di lingua prima di partire? Qualcuno l’ha fatto
    Qual’è la situazione lavorativa, quali sono le specializzazioni più richieste?
    Come funziona la specialità? sul modello tedeso, ovvero ogni ospedale forma i medici a differenza del nostro paese in cui la specialità si consegue attraverso l’università?
    Ringrazio chiunque risponderà 🙂

    #2035

    Arca88
    Membro
    @Arca88

    mi aggiungo pure io a matte90, sono una studentessa al terzo anno di medicina e vorrei specializzarmi in norvegia, ma non trovo niente di esaustivo su internet, se non in norvegese.
    l’unica cosa che ho capito fino ad ora è che la specializzazione dovrebbe funzionare come in Germania.

    #3545

    Giuls1990
    Membro
    @Giuls1990

    mi aggiungo pure io a matte90, sono una studentessa al terzo anno di medicina e vorrei specializzarmi in norvegia, ma non trovo niente di esaustivo su internet, se non in norvegese.
    l’unica cosa che ho capito fino ad ora è che la specializzazione dovrebbe funzionare come in Germania.

    #2036

    soter
    Membro
    @soter

    Ciao!
    Sono uno studente che si appresta a cominciare il VI anno, e vi scrivo dalla Pianura Padana, senza esperienze norvegesi al seguito, ma possibili future. Per cui se mi domandare posso solo dirvi cosa penso o cosa spero, nulla di più 😉

    Cercando su google però posso dirvi di aver trovato questo:
    Norway/Doctor immigration to Norway

    Expert: Roy Helge Rasmussen – 9/8/2012

    Question
    I’ll be finishing up my medical residency in the US in a couple of years and in considering where I’d ultimately like to settle down and practice, I’ve become interested in the idea of emigrating elsewhere. I’m a US citizen, trained in a US medical school. Everyone tells me I’d be crazy to leave the American medical system where physician pay is frankly obscene, but money isn’t everything. I’m just wondering if you’ve got any insight into how much need there is/how difficult it is for a (soon to be) fully credentialed American doctor to immigrate and find work? I’m married with two children and trained as an ophthalmic surgeon if that makes any difference. Thanks in advance.

    Answer
    An american MD would find it rather easy to be certified in norway. The main obstacle is the language barrier. If you’re going to work with people (and being an MD it is hard to avoid that) you’ll have to pass a language aptitude test for foreign medical personell. This test is rather strict and requires quite some effort. You want to understand what people are saying when prescribing medicines.

    There are lots of MD openings, particularily up in the north of norway. So if you want to experience arctic life, using a boat through the winter storms to deliver babies out in the boonies, requiring helicopters to pick up sick reindeer herders on the tundra – then you can have your lifes adventure.

    But since you’re an eye surgeon, my guess is that one of the 20 or so big hospitals will swallow you whole as soon as you’re certified to work in norway.

    have a look at:
    http://english.sak.no
    _________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Dal sito qui sopra ci si collega a questo:

    Studied abroad?
    http://english.sak.no/sites/sak-english/how-to-apply/studied-abroad/Sider/default.aspx#.Uh4Paz_9WJY

    ​People who have studied abroad are covered by different rules concerning authorisation and licences than those who have completed their education in Norway.

    Studies in the EU/EEA
    Some courses are regulated by the EU’s Professional Qualifications Directive, which means that the process through to authorisation is simple, easy and fast. If your education is not regulated by the Professional Qualifications Directive, you will be required to document the content of your education to us, so that we can assess whether your education is as good as the corresponding Norwegian education. We call this an equivalence assessment. The five professional studies that are covered by the Professional Qualifications Directive are:

    Nurse
    Midwife
    Pharmacist

    Doctor
    Dental practitioner

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway.

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden

    Questa parte non vi interesserà, la metto x correttezza
    Studies in a country outside the EU/EEA
    If you trained in a country outside the EU/EEA, the authorisation process requires you to submit additional documentation. This additional documentation is necessary in order to assess whether your education is equivalent to the corresponding Norwegian education. Special rules apply to doctors trained outside the EU/EEA. Such doctors must have their education verified through the US verification agency ECFMG.

    You will not automatically be granted authorisation, even if you have studied abroad with support from the Norwegian State Educational Loan Fund. SAK does not approve courses in advance. We must base our conclusions on what the applicant has actually done and completed. People who are considering studying a medical subject in a country outside the EU/EEA should contact a Norwegian study centre which offers an equivalent course, NOKUT or ANSA.

    Read more about studying abroad:

    ANSA
    NOKUT

    Read more about verification of medical training for doctors from a country outside the EU/EEA.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Practical service for medical practitioners
    http://english.sak.no/sites/sak-english/how-to-apply/authorisation-and-licence/practical-service-for-medical-practitioners/Sider/default.aspx#.Uh4PUD_9WJY

    ​New scheme regulating practical service for medical practitioners
    A new scheme regulating the medical practice for medical practitioners was adopted on 1 December 2012. It implies an alteration of the time of authorisation. For the time being, there will be two parallel schemes regulating practical service for medical practitioners. Doctors, who are already part of the “old scheme”, will remain within that system, while doctors who have not yet entered into practical service will refer to the “new scheme”.

    Who shall apply for practical service for the to possibility to enter a specialist course?

    All medical practitioners educated in Norway
    Medical practitioners educated in an EU/EEA country where practical service is not integrated in the curriculum, unless the applicant has completed practical service or similar in the country of education.
    Medical practitioners educated outside the EU/EEA, where the completed education has been assessed equivalent or very similar to the corresponding Norwegian training.
    Medical practitioners who are educated in an EU/EEA country where the practical service is integrated in the curriculum, if they themselves so wish. These candidates may also be hired directly for LiS-positions (specialist course)

    Who belongs to which scheme?
    “Old scheme”:
    All medical practitioners who have obtained a position by decision by lot and have commenced the practical service or have applied for and obtained a postponement of their practical service, belongs to this group.

    “New Scheme”:
    All medical practitioners who have applied for and been hired in positions by using webcruiter.

    You are currently carrying out your practical service
    All medical practitioners who are educated by one of the Norwegian faculties of medicine, may at any given time apply for and obtain an authorization, regardless whether you have completed your practical service or not. You may as well decide to continue your practical service all the while obtaining an authorization. However, if you decide to interrupt you already initiated practical service, you will have to apply for and be hired through the webcruiter-portal, as designated by the “new scheme”.
    Your practical service (“old scheme”) has been annulled

    You need to apply for and be hired through the webcruiter portal as designated by the “new scheme”.
    You have been assessed having an education that is equivalent to similar the Norwegian education
    All medical practitioners who are deemed by SAK to hold an education that is equivalent to the similar Norwegian education may apply for authorisation.

    How to apply for positions
    The new practical service scheme is based on applications and is similar to ordinary hiring processes elsewhere in society. Medical practitioners who have just graduated may now apply for practical service positions. These positions where previously divided among the candidates by decision by lot. The positions are published on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health, while the hiring process itself takes place locally at each hospital.
    All medical practitioners who hold an authorisation, or qualifies for authorisation may apply for these positions.
    The hiring process takes place twice a year on a national scale. Both times the hiring process will be divided into two separate pools. The first pool will normally be restricted to positions at hospitals where recruiting has been challenging.
    Once, If you have accepted a position at a hospital, you cannot accept offers other hospitals within the next 6 months.
    You can, at any time, register your CV at the webcruiter portal on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health.

    “Remaining positions”
    Positions which become available outside the regular hiring processes will be published and made available in the webcruiter portal. These positions will normally be shorter temporary engagements. The temporary positions published on the webcruiter portal will be made part of already initiated practical service.

    Access to profession for newly educated medical practitioners
    Medical practitioners will from now on not necessarily possess a completed practical service. These medical practitioners will nevertheless have authorisation to practice.
    Medical practitioners who do not possess practical service, are not entitled to commence a specialisation course (LiS), practice as municipal emergency doctor, nor hold positions as General Medical Practitioner. The amended Regulation does not require of the medical practitioner to possess practical service for other positions in the health sector.

    Reference for completed practical service
    Medical practitioners may use the attached form , mail the completed form to SAK in order to be fully registered (Practical service added to the authorization) in the Norwegian Health Personnel Register.

    Application form for authorisation as Medical Practitioner after completed practical service (pdf)

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway:

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden
    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Ed infine, ecco gli ultimi link utili:
    Application for authorisation and license as health personnel
    Linee Guida per Application for authorisation and license as health personnel
    REGISTRATION OF MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS IN NORWAY: A guide to Norwegian registration of medical practitioners trained abroad, Issued jointly by Norwegian Board of Health Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo Norwegian Medical Association

    #3638

    alessioikari
    Membro
    @alessioikari

    Ciao!
    Sono uno studente che si appresta a cominciare il VI anno, e vi scrivo dalla Pianura Padana, senza esperienze norvegesi al seguito, ma possibili future. Per cui se mi domandare posso solo dirvi cosa penso o cosa spero, nulla di più 😉

    Cercando su google però posso dirvi di aver trovato questo:
    Norway/Doctor immigration to Norway

    Expert: Roy Helge Rasmussen – 9/8/2012

    Question
    I’ll be finishing up my medical residency in the US in a couple of years and in considering where I’d ultimately like to settle down and practice, I’ve become interested in the idea of emigrating elsewhere. I’m a US citizen, trained in a US medical school. Everyone tells me I’d be crazy to leave the American medical system where physician pay is frankly obscene, but money isn’t everything. I’m just wondering if you’ve got any insight into how much need there is/how difficult it is for a (soon to be) fully credentialed American doctor to immigrate and find work? I’m married with two children and trained as an ophthalmic surgeon if that makes any difference. Thanks in advance.

    Answer
    An american MD would find it rather easy to be certified in norway. The main obstacle is the language barrier. If you’re going to work with people (and being an MD it is hard to avoid that) you’ll have to pass a language aptitude test for foreign medical personell. This test is rather strict and requires quite some effort. You want to understand what people are saying when prescribing medicines.

    There are lots of MD openings, particularily up in the north of norway. So if you want to experience arctic life, using a boat through the winter storms to deliver babies out in the boonies, requiring helicopters to pick up sick reindeer herders on the tundra – then you can have your lifes adventure.

    But since you’re an eye surgeon, my guess is that one of the 20 or so big hospitals will swallow you whole as soon as you’re certified to work in norway.

    have a look at:
    http://english.sak.no
    _________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Dal sito qui sopra ci si collega a questo:

    Studied abroad?
    http://english.sak.no/sites/sak-english/how-to-apply/studied-abroad/Sider/default.aspx#.Uh4Paz_9WJY

    ​People who have studied abroad are covered by different rules concerning authorisation and licences than those who have completed their education in Norway.

    Studies in the EU/EEA
    Some courses are regulated by the EU’s Professional Qualifications Directive, which means that the process through to authorisation is simple, easy and fast. If your education is not regulated by the Professional Qualifications Directive, you will be required to document the content of your education to us, so that we can assess whether your education is as good as the corresponding Norwegian education. We call this an equivalence assessment. The five professional studies that are covered by the Professional Qualifications Directive are:

    Nurse
    Midwife
    Pharmacist

    Doctor
    Dental practitioner

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway.

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden

    Questa parte non vi interesserà, la metto x correttezza
    Studies in a country outside the EU/EEA
    If you trained in a country outside the EU/EEA, the authorisation process requires you to submit additional documentation. This additional documentation is necessary in order to assess whether your education is equivalent to the corresponding Norwegian education. Special rules apply to doctors trained outside the EU/EEA. Such doctors must have their education verified through the US verification agency ECFMG.

    You will not automatically be granted authorisation, even if you have studied abroad with support from the Norwegian State Educational Loan Fund. SAK does not approve courses in advance. We must base our conclusions on what the applicant has actually done and completed. People who are considering studying a medical subject in a country outside the EU/EEA should contact a Norwegian study centre which offers an equivalent course, NOKUT or ANSA.

    Read more about studying abroad:

    ANSA
    NOKUT

    Read more about verification of medical training for doctors from a country outside the EU/EEA.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Practical service for medical practitioners
    http://english.sak.no/sites/sak-english/how-to-apply/authorisation-and-licence/practical-service-for-medical-practitioners/Sider/default.aspx#.Uh4PUD_9WJY

    ​New scheme regulating practical service for medical practitioners
    A new scheme regulating the medical practice for medical practitioners was adopted on 1 December 2012. It implies an alteration of the time of authorisation. For the time being, there will be two parallel schemes regulating practical service for medical practitioners. Doctors, who are already part of the “old scheme”, will remain within that system, while doctors who have not yet entered into practical service will refer to the “new scheme”.

    Who shall apply for practical service for the to possibility to enter a specialist course?

    All medical practitioners educated in Norway
    Medical practitioners educated in an EU/EEA country where practical service is not integrated in the curriculum, unless the applicant has completed practical service or similar in the country of education.
    Medical practitioners educated outside the EU/EEA, where the completed education has been assessed equivalent or very similar to the corresponding Norwegian training.
    Medical practitioners who are educated in an EU/EEA country where the practical service is integrated in the curriculum, if they themselves so wish. These candidates may also be hired directly for LiS-positions (specialist course)

    Who belongs to which scheme?
    “Old scheme”:
    All medical practitioners who have obtained a position by decision by lot and have commenced the practical service or have applied for and obtained a postponement of their practical service, belongs to this group.

    “New Scheme”:
    All medical practitioners who have applied for and been hired in positions by using webcruiter.

    You are currently carrying out your practical service
    All medical practitioners who are educated by one of the Norwegian faculties of medicine, may at any given time apply for and obtain an authorization, regardless whether you have completed your practical service or not. You may as well decide to continue your practical service all the while obtaining an authorization. However, if you decide to interrupt you already initiated practical service, you will have to apply for and be hired through the webcruiter-portal, as designated by the “new scheme”.
    Your practical service (“old scheme”) has been annulled

    You need to apply for and be hired through the webcruiter portal as designated by the “new scheme”.
    You have been assessed having an education that is equivalent to similar the Norwegian education
    All medical practitioners who are deemed by SAK to hold an education that is equivalent to the similar Norwegian education may apply for authorisation.

    How to apply for positions
    The new practical service scheme is based on applications and is similar to ordinary hiring processes elsewhere in society. Medical practitioners who have just graduated may now apply for practical service positions. These positions where previously divided among the candidates by decision by lot. The positions are published on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health, while the hiring process itself takes place locally at each hospital.
    All medical practitioners who hold an authorisation, or qualifies for authorisation may apply for these positions.
    The hiring process takes place twice a year on a national scale. Both times the hiring process will be divided into two separate pools. The first pool will normally be restricted to positions at hospitals where recruiting has been challenging.
    Once, If you have accepted a position at a hospital, you cannot accept offers other hospitals within the next 6 months.
    You can, at any time, register your CV at the webcruiter portal on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health.

    “Remaining positions”
    Positions which become available outside the regular hiring processes will be published and made available in the webcruiter portal. These positions will normally be shorter temporary engagements. The temporary positions published on the webcruiter portal will be made part of already initiated practical service.

    Access to profession for newly educated medical practitioners
    Medical practitioners will from now on not necessarily possess a completed practical service. These medical practitioners will nevertheless have authorisation to practice.
    Medical practitioners who do not possess practical service, are not entitled to commence a specialisation course (LiS), practice as municipal emergency doctor, nor hold positions as General Medical Practitioner. The amended Regulation does not require of the medical practitioner to possess practical service for other positions in the health sector.

    Reference for completed practical service
    Medical practitioners may use the attached form , mail the completed form to SAK in order to be fully registered (Practical service added to the authorization) in the Norwegian Health Personnel Register.

    Application form for authorisation as Medical Practitioner after completed practical service (pdf)

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway:

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden
    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Ed infine, ecco gli ultimi link utili:
    Application for authorisation and license as health personnel
    Linee Guida per Application for authorisation and license as health personnel
    REGISTRATION OF MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS IN NORWAY: A guide to Norwegian registration of medical practitioners trained abroad, Issued jointly by Norwegian Board of Health Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo Norwegian Medical Association

    #2037

    soter
    Membro
    @soter

    Mi ero dimenticato questo 😛

    Medical Practitioner educated in the EU/EEA

    ​A doctor’s principal area of work is the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Doctors must possess a good knowledge of medicine and have good interpersonal skills. As a doctor, you will be responsible for ensuring that the treatment you give treats your patients’ complaints and provides relief.

    Educated in Norway
    The medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor consists of a six-year university course. Students are in regular contact with patients throughout the course, and emphasis is placed on ensuring that the practical experience is as varied as possible.

    Have you completed the medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor within an EU/EEA country?
    Such applicants are processed in line with the Professional Qualifications Directive. The general rule is so-called ‘automatic recognition’. This means that minimum requirements are established for the training in the various EU/EEA countries. If you have completed training which gives the right to practise the profession in one EU/EEA country, and hold the diploma mentioned in the Professional Qualifications Directive, you will have fulfilled the requirements that must be met in order to practise the profession in the other EU/EEA countries. If you have completed the medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor in another EU/EEA country, you can apply for authorisation as a doctor from SAK. The fee is NOK 1560.

    Licence or authorisation
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation.

    EU/EEA Countries where practical experience is not integrated into the curriculum may apply for practical service in Norway. If you are educated in an EU/EEA country where practical service is not integrated in the curriculum, SAK ask for documentation of supplementary practice the applicant may have carried out, in order to provide as much information of the applicant’s experience as possible. For those who need to carry out practical service in Norway prior to obtaining a full authorisation, the fee is NOK 2470.

    Further down you will find the list of EU/EEA-countries with integrated practical service.

    Application process
    For authorisation or a temporary licence you must send us a “confirmed true copy” of:

    Passport
    Diploma
    Authorisation as a doctor from the country of education, or if applicable another EU/EEA country.
    Certificate of Current Professional Status (CCPS) from the health authority in the country of education.

    Application for registration in the Norwegian Health personnel Register (HPR)

    Medical Practitioners, who are carrying out practical service under the new scheme, already holding an authorisation, may use this form to inform SAK about the completion of practical service for notification to the Norwegian Health Personell register.

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway.

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden

    #3639

    alessioikari
    Membro
    @alessioikari

    Mi ero dimenticato questo 😛

    Medical Practitioner educated in the EU/EEA

    ​A doctor’s principal area of work is the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Doctors must possess a good knowledge of medicine and have good interpersonal skills. As a doctor, you will be responsible for ensuring that the treatment you give treats your patients’ complaints and provides relief.

    Educated in Norway
    The medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor consists of a six-year university course. Students are in regular contact with patients throughout the course, and emphasis is placed on ensuring that the practical experience is as varied as possible.

    Have you completed the medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor within an EU/EEA country?
    Such applicants are processed in line with the Professional Qualifications Directive. The general rule is so-called ‘automatic recognition’. This means that minimum requirements are established for the training in the various EU/EEA countries. If you have completed training which gives the right to practise the profession in one EU/EEA country, and hold the diploma mentioned in the Professional Qualifications Directive, you will have fulfilled the requirements that must be met in order to practise the profession in the other EU/EEA countries. If you have completed the medical training necessary to qualify as a doctor in another EU/EEA country, you can apply for authorisation as a doctor from SAK. The fee is NOK 1560.

    Licence or authorisation
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation.

    EU/EEA Countries where practical experience is not integrated into the curriculum may apply for practical service in Norway. If you are educated in an EU/EEA country where practical service is not integrated in the curriculum, SAK ask for documentation of supplementary practice the applicant may have carried out, in order to provide as much information of the applicant’s experience as possible. For those who need to carry out practical service in Norway prior to obtaining a full authorisation, the fee is NOK 2470.

    Further down you will find the list of EU/EEA-countries with integrated practical service.

    Application process
    For authorisation or a temporary licence you must send us a “confirmed true copy” of:

    Passport
    Diploma
    Authorisation as a doctor from the country of education, or if applicable another EU/EEA country.
    Certificate of Current Professional Status (CCPS) from the health authority in the country of education.

    Application for registration in the Norwegian Health personnel Register (HPR)

    Medical Practitioners, who are carrying out practical service under the new scheme, already holding an authorisation, may use this form to inform SAK about the completion of practical service for notification to the Norwegian Health Personell register.

    List of countries where practical service is integrated in the medical studies
    Recently qualified medical candidates who have completed medical training in an EU/EEA country where practical experience has been integrated into the training can apply for direct authorisation. Students having completed medical studies in Norway are subjects to direct authorisation. The EU/EEA countries which fall within this category are:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Greece
    Cyprus
    Latvia
    The Netherlands
    Romania
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    The Czech Republic
    Germany
    Hungary
    Austria

    List of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education
    Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education. Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway.

    Denmark
    Ireland
    Iceland
    Italy
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxemburg
    Malta
    Poland
    Portugal
    The United Kingdom
    Sweden

    #2038

    sh4rp87
    Membro
    @sh4rp87

    Peeerò! Grazie!! Interessantissimi! Grazie mille per aver risposto 🙂

    #3640

    Matte90
    Membro
    @Matte90

    Peeerò! Grazie!! Interessantissimi! Grazie mille per aver risposto 🙂

    #2039

    soter
    Membro
    @soter

    Vi posto altri 2 link che ho recuperato oggi:

    Questo spiega in modo generico alcune cose riguardo l’universo del lavoro e della formazione del medico in Norvegia

    http://www.bleedle.net/norway-doctors/

    Working in Norway(formato.pdf)

    Through many years thousands of foreign doctors have been working in Norway. Due to chronical shortage of doctors, the country has been quite eager to attract doctors from abroad, mainly specialist doctors, to fill vacant positions in the constantly expanding health care sector. Especially, of course, Norway has attracted doctors from the neighbouring countries, Denmark and Sweden, who have similar languages and culture. Long time before the existence of the EU, the Nordic countries had a common job marked, and relevant university and speciality degrees and authorisations were accepted without greater problems.

    Same, same
    In general the health care systems in Scan-
    dinavia are quite alike. Almost every pa-
    tient doctor contact is in the public sector.
    There are only a few private clinics and
    small specialized hospitals. During the last
    years the activity in the private sector has
    risen due to changes in the political en-
    vironment and the well-known chronic
    economical crisis in the health care sector.
    But Norway has, due to its relative pros-
    perousness, given, so far, patients and
    healthcare workers relatively good condi-
    tions. The years ahead will, without doubt,
    become far tougher for all. Many structural
    reforms have taken place during the last
    few years, where small hospitals and units
    were closed and a more centralized struc-
    ture regarding specialist care has been
    established. Furthermore centralization at
    the management and political level has tak-
    en place and budgets are being tightened.
    All in all this development has reduced the
    growth in demand for healthcare person-
    nel, including doctors. Nevertheless, there
    are still quite good changes to get a job,
    especially in more remote areas. In general
    there is no unemployment for healthcare
    personnel, whereas in many professions
    there is a shortage.

    Country
    The majority of the 4 million Norwegians
    live in the five biggest cities in this vast
    country. However, so far, national policy
    targets at the population of the most
    remote areas, including the need for hospi-
    tals there. Of course, this increases the
    demand for doctors, but it is often quite
    difficult to get a doctor to stay for a longer
    time at a permanent base because of the
    isolation, both personal and professional.
    On the other hand, this is a great possi-
    bility to experience places you would
    never go to, and for sure never would live
    in, if it was not for this reason. And the
    nature gives good opportunities to recreate
    after many years in an overcrowded and
    polluted world.

    Training
    Like in most other countries, there is an 18
    month internship after university and doc-
    tor (medical) school. After this, one can
    start specialisation. Most of the basic spe-
    cialisations demand about four years of
    work in the core field, i.e. anaesthesia and
    then one year in another speciality as a
    supplementary training. Beside this, there
    are several obligatory courses relevant for
    the speciality. At least 18 months of the
    speciality training should take place at a
    university clinic. To become sub- specialised,
    one needs of course more training.
    There are very good possibilities for
    funding of the theoretical specialist train-
    ing. Relevant working experience from the
    home country should be taken into consid-
    eration when applying for a speciality in
    Norway. However, many colleagues have
    had considerable problems during the last
    years, due to paranoia in the Norwegian
    Medical Association. So a very good advice
    is, to start the procedure before arrival or in
    the very beginning of your Norwegian
    adventure.
    At many hospitals and counties, they can
    offer you an apartment to rent, kinder-
    garten or maybe a career opportunity for a
    partner.

    Working conditions
    The weekly working hours are a minimum
    of 38 hours, but often amount to 40–45 as
    an average over time. If you work more,
    one will get paid extra or it is possible to
    have a paid leave. So the working hours
    are much more pleasant than in many oth-
    er European countries. Five week holidays
    and a lot of public holidays should give
    you a good opportunity to become familiar
    with the country and its people.
    The salary starts approximately at

    40,000 and a consultant can earn up to

    100,000. There are furthermore good pos-
    sibilities to increase this salary with extra
    work at both public and private clinics.
    This relatively good salary is, however
    balanced by the world’s highest living costs
    and a quite high personal income tax, at
    around 50%. This is partly compensated by
    a 15% tax reduction for foreigners the first
    four years of their stay in the country.
    At last, the people, your future col-
    leagues, are very pleasant. There is not a
    very hierarchic organization in Norwegian
    hospitals, which are profiting from the
    country’s egalitarian way of life. You will
    have the chance to profit as well if you
    dare….
    ________________________
    Dr. Niels Mosbech
    Senior Consultant,
    Paediatric Anaesthesia
    Department of Anaesthesia
    Ullevaal University Hospital,
    Oslo, Norway
    mosbech@gmail.com
    _______________________
    Dr. Niels Mosbech
    Hospital Post 03/2005, pp3, GIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt,
    http://www.hospital-post.com

    Qualche info di tipo economica da quest’altro blog

    Dulcis in fundo..su un blog (non sto a riportare quello che ho trovato perchè è inutile..) ho trovato uno studente dal Sud America che parlava dei test di lingua Bergenstest e OSCE. Sono certo che siano obbligatori x i medici non-UE, ma per quelli provenienti dall’UE non saprei :-X

    #3641

    alessioikari
    Membro
    @alessioikari

    Vi posto altri 2 link che ho recuperato oggi:

    Questo spiega in modo generico alcune cose riguardo l’universo del lavoro e della formazione del medico in Norvegia

    http://www.bleedle.net/norway-doctors/

    Working in Norway(formato.pdf)

    Through many years thousands of foreign doctors have been working in Norway. Due to chronical shortage of doctors, the country has been quite eager to attract doctors from abroad, mainly specialist doctors, to fill vacant positions in the constantly expanding health care sector. Especially, of course, Norway has attracted doctors from the neighbouring countries, Denmark and Sweden, who have similar languages and culture. Long time before the existence of the EU, the Nordic countries had a common job marked, and relevant university and speciality degrees and authorisations were accepted without greater problems.

    Same, same
    In general the health care systems in Scan-
    dinavia are quite alike. Almost every pa-
    tient doctor contact is in the public sector.
    There are only a few private clinics and
    small specialized hospitals. During the last
    years the activity in the private sector has
    risen due to changes in the political en-
    vironment and the well-known chronic
    economical crisis in the health care sector.
    But Norway has, due to its relative pros-
    perousness, given, so far, patients and
    healthcare workers relatively good condi-
    tions. The years ahead will, without doubt,
    become far tougher for all. Many structural
    reforms have taken place during the last
    few years, where small hospitals and units
    were closed and a more centralized struc-
    ture regarding specialist care has been
    established. Furthermore centralization at
    the management and political level has tak-
    en place and budgets are being tightened.
    All in all this development has reduced the
    growth in demand for healthcare person-
    nel, including doctors. Nevertheless, there
    are still quite good changes to get a job,
    especially in more remote areas. In general
    there is no unemployment for healthcare
    personnel, whereas in many professions
    there is a shortage.

    Country
    The majority of the 4 million Norwegians
    live in the five biggest cities in this vast
    country. However, so far, national policy
    targets at the population of the most
    remote areas, including the need for hospi-
    tals there. Of course, this increases the
    demand for doctors, but it is often quite
    difficult to get a doctor to stay for a longer
    time at a permanent base because of the
    isolation, both personal and professional.
    On the other hand, this is a great possi-
    bility to experience places you would
    never go to, and for sure never would live
    in, if it was not for this reason. And the
    nature gives good opportunities to recreate
    after many years in an overcrowded and
    polluted world.

    Training
    Like in most other countries, there is an 18
    month internship after university and doc-
    tor (medical) school. After this, one can
    start specialisation. Most of the basic spe-
    cialisations demand about four years of
    work in the core field, i.e. anaesthesia and
    then one year in another speciality as a
    supplementary training. Beside this, there
    are several obligatory courses relevant for
    the speciality. At least 18 months of the
    speciality training should take place at a
    university clinic. To become sub- specialised,
    one needs of course more training.
    There are very good possibilities for
    funding of the theoretical specialist train-
    ing. Relevant working experience from the
    home country should be taken into consid-
    eration when applying for a speciality in
    Norway. However, many colleagues have
    had considerable problems during the last
    years, due to paranoia in the Norwegian
    Medical Association. So a very good advice
    is, to start the procedure before arrival or in
    the very beginning of your Norwegian
    adventure.
    At many hospitals and counties, they can
    offer you an apartment to rent, kinder-
    garten or maybe a career opportunity for a
    partner.

    Working conditions
    The weekly working hours are a minimum
    of 38 hours, but often amount to 40–45 as
    an average over time. If you work more,
    one will get paid extra or it is possible to
    have a paid leave. So the working hours
    are much more pleasant than in many oth-
    er European countries. Five week holidays
    and a lot of public holidays should give
    you a good opportunity to become familiar
    with the country and its people.
    The salary starts approximately at

    40,000 and a consultant can earn up to

    100,000. There are furthermore good pos-
    sibilities to increase this salary with extra
    work at both public and private clinics.
    This relatively good salary is, however
    balanced by the world’s highest living costs
    and a quite high personal income tax, at
    around 50%. This is partly compensated by
    a 15% tax reduction for foreigners the first
    four years of their stay in the country.
    At last, the people, your future col-
    leagues, are very pleasant. There is not a
    very hierarchic organization in Norwegian
    hospitals, which are profiting from the
    country’s egalitarian way of life. You will
    have the chance to profit as well if you
    dare….
    ________________________
    Dr. Niels Mosbech
    Senior Consultant,
    Paediatric Anaesthesia
    Department of Anaesthesia
    Ullevaal University Hospital,
    Oslo, Norway
    mosbech@gmail.com
    _______________________
    Dr. Niels Mosbech
    Hospital Post 03/2005, pp3, GIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt,
    http://www.hospital-post.com

    Qualche info di tipo economica da quest’altro blog

    Dulcis in fundo..su un blog (non sto a riportare quello che ho trovato perchè è inutile..) ho trovato uno studente dal Sud America che parlava dei test di lingua Bergenstest e OSCE. Sono certo che siano obbligatori x i medici non-UE, ma per quelli provenienti dall’UE non saprei :-X

    #2040

    roberto073
    Membro
    @roberto073

    Basta Spam Alessio Ikari XD!

    #3704

    Steve
    Partecipante
    @Steve

    Basta Spam Alessio Ikari XD!

    #2041

    soter
    Membro
    @soter

    Altro aggiornamento: l’altro giorno mi ha risposto quello che immagino essere il ministero della salute norvegese (il “SAK“)

    Mia Domanda
    My Country (Italy) is in the list of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education.
    I’m not sure I understand this part: Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education.Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway. (from the site http://english.sak.no)
    Does it means that an Italian citizen graduated in medicine who wants to become a Medical Practitioner in Norway must take the exam to become a fully qualified doctor in Italy? Or he/she would become a fully qualified doctorcompleting medical practice in Norway?

    Loro risposta
    As long as you have taken the necessary exams to start specialization in your home country, the same will be the case in Norway. The list is meant for those that apply for recognition without having authorization in their homestate.

    #3706

    alessioikari
    Membro
    @alessioikari

    Altro aggiornamento: l’altro giorno mi ha risposto quello che immagino essere il ministero della salute norvegese (il “SAK“)

    Mia Domanda
    My Country (Italy) is in the list of EU/EEA countries which have not integrated practical service within the medical education.
    I’m not sure I understand this part: Applicants from these countries must complete medical practice prior to applying for authorisation as medical practitioner in Norway, unless the applicant have completed practical service or similar in his/hers country of education.Applicants from these countries may apply for practical service license when offered a practice position in Norway. (from the site http://english.sak.no)
    Does it means that an Italian citizen graduated in medicine who wants to become a Medical Practitioner in Norway must take the exam to become a fully qualified doctor in Italy? Or he/she would become a fully qualified doctorcompleting medical practice in Norway?

    Loro risposta
    As long as you have taken the necessary exams to start specialization in your home country, the same will be the case in Norway. The list is meant for those that apply for recognition without having authorization in their homestate.

Stai vedendo 15 articoli - dal 1 a 15 (di 57 totali)

Devi essere loggato per rispondere a questa discussione.